Africanizing Anthropology: Fieldwork, Networks, and the by Lyn Schumaker

By Lyn Schumaker

Africanizing Anthropology tells the tale of the anthropological fieldwork based on the Rhodes-Livingstone Institute in Northern Rhodesia (now Zambia) throughout the mid-twentieth century. targeting collaborative methods instead of at the task of person researchers, Lyn Schumaker offers the assistants and informants of anthropologists a important position within the making of anthropological knowledge.Schumaker exhibits how neighborhood stipulations and native rules approximately tradition and historical past, in addition to prior adventure of outsiders’ curiosity, form neighborhood people’s responses to anthropological fieldwork and support them, in flip, to steer the development of information approximately their societies and lives. Bringing to the fore a variety of actors—missionaries, directors, settlers, the households of anthropologists—Schumaker emphasizes the day-by-day practices of researchers, demonstrating how those are as centrally implicated within the making of anthropological knowlege because the discipline’s tools. picking a well-liked staff of anthropologists—The Manchester School—she unearths how they completed the advances in thought and process that made them well-known within the Nineteen Fifties and 1960s.This ebook makes very important contributions to anthropology, African background, and the background of technological know-how.

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Africanizing Anthropology: Fieldwork, Networks, and the Making of Cultural Knowledge in Central Africa

Africanizing Anthropology tells the tale of the anthropological fieldwork headquartered on the Rhodes-Livingstone Institute in Northern Rhodesia (now Zambia) through the mid-twentieth century. concentrating on collaborative approaches instead of at the task of person researchers, Lyn Schumaker supplies the assistants and informants of anthropologists a principal function within the making of anthropological wisdom.

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Additional resources for Africanizing Anthropology: Fieldwork, Networks, and the Making of Cultural Knowledge in Central Africa

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In other areas American involvement was more direct. The American Context The history of the rli could also be told as an American story, both in terms of the discipline of anthropology and in terms of the history of Africa. For Anglo-American anthropologists, finding work to do in the postwar world led to an interest in doing research for development, as well as an interest in urbanizing, industrializing societies with multiracial dimensions. Thus, central and southern Africa held interest for anthropologists whatever their nationality, and particularly for American anthropologists, who themselves lived in a racially divided society.

Cowboy music’’ and ‘‘cowboy movies’’ dominated popular entertainment, including the film shows taken to Africans in the countryside and shown in the urban recreational centers provided by the mining companies. American folk music influenced African township bands and helped to inspire the African nationalist protest songs of the 1950s. ≤≤ The importance of the race question in the United States led American foundations to fund social research in Africa. In their view, southern Africa’s multiracial societies could be used as a human laboratory for testing future policies on black education, race relations, and other areas before putting them into practice at home.

The final chapter, ‘‘The Culture of Fieldwork,’’ considers the historical impact of the rli, its subsequent history, and the conclusions that can be drawn from its history about the nature of fieldwork in anthropology. This chapter follows the legacy of the rli, beginning with the fourth director J. Clyde Mitchell’s move to the Federation’s first university in Southern Rhodesia in 1956. The diaspora of researchers and research assistants that began in 1956 with these changes is described, as rli people, practices, and ideas moved into academic, government, and development contexts, both in central Africa and elsewhere.

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